Anti-Inflammatory Cooking

The anti-inflammatory diet is an eating plan designed to prevent or reduce low-grade chronic inflammation, a key risk factor in a host of health problems and several major diseases. The typical anti-inflammatory diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, protein, nuts, seeds, and healthy fats.

Often resulting from lifestyle factors like stress and a lack of exercise, chronic inflammation results when the immune system releases chemicals meant to combat injury and bacterial and virus infections, even when there are no apparent foreign invaders to fight off. These invaders often hide and can be found and handled through Nutrition Response Testing.

Since our food choices influence the level of inflammation in our bodies, the anti-inflammatory diet is helpful to curb chronic inflammation and help prevent or treat the following conditions: allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, asthma, cancer, depression, diabetes, gout, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease (such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), stroke, Hashimoto’s and other autoimmune diseases.

Dr. Lisa has found that concentrating on flavors creates delicious dishes. Instead of automatically adding salt, when tasting what you’re cooking, ask yourself “what flavor is missing?” Is it…

  • Salty
  • Sweet
  • Bitter
  • Sour

Here are some suggestions for adding these flavors to your dish:

  • Salty: sea salt, Himalayan pink salt, Herbamare (Dr. Lisa’s favorite)
  • Sour: apple cider vinegar (with “the mother”), lemon, lime
  • Sweet: (In small amounts) onions, garlic, orange, apple, honey
  • Bitter: horseradish, dark leafy greens

General Tips:

  • Aim for a variety
  • Include as much fresh food as possible
  • Minimize your consumption of processed and fast foods
  • Eliminate sugars from your diet, especially artificial sweeteners
  • Eat an abundance of fruits and vegetables in all parts of the color spectrum
  • Choose organic whenever possible
  • Focus on eating lots of dark leafy greens
  • Drink tea instead of coffee (black, green, herbal)
  • Focus on water consumption
  • Eat twice as many vegetables as fruits
  • Meats should be grass-fed
  • Stay away from juices
  • Avoid hydrogenated oils (margarine, peanut, corn, cottonseed, vegetable)
  • Try to include good carbohydrates, fat, and protein at each meal

Foods to Focus on:

  • Berries (blueberries, raspberries, blackberries)
  • Cherries
  • Apples
  • Artichokes
  • Avocados
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Dark leafy vegetables (kale, spinach, collards)
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Broccoli
  • Nuts (walnuts, almonds, pecans, hazelnuts)
  • Beans (red beans, pinto beans, black beans)
  • Whole grains (oats and brown rice)
  • Dark chocolate (at least 70% cocoa)

Herbs & Spices & Add-ins

  • Ginger
  • Turmeric
  • Garlic
  • For sweeteners – raw local honey, grade B maple syrup, Sucanat

Foods high in omega-3 fatty acids:

  • Wild-caught oily fish (salmon, herring, mackerel, sardines, anchovies)
  • Flaxseed
  • Walnuts
  • Eggs

Most Inflammatory Foods to AVOID:

  • Low-quality grains & gluten
  • Dairy
  • Soy
  • Processed meats
  • Sugar
  • Bad hydrogenated fats

Meal Ideas:

Breakfast foods: breakfast smoothie, chia bowl, oatmeal.

Lunch: salad with quinoa and vegetables, soup, grilled salmon. Use lettuce wraps instead of tortillas.

Snacks: fresh blueberry fruit salad, apples, and nut butter, walnuts, chia seed pudding, guacamole.

Beverages: ginger turmeric tea, golden milk, green juice, green smoothie, herbal tea, turmeric tea, green tea.

If you would like to learn more about how to keep an anti-inflammatory diet, give us a call at 410-717-6610.

Sources:
https://www.drweil.com/diet-nutrition/anti-inflammatory-diet-pyramid/dr-weils-anti-inflammatory-diet/
https://www.verywellhealth.com/anti-inflammatory-diet-88752

Knee Pain & Chiropractic Care

What causes knee pain?

There is no single cause for painful knee joints, but there are generally 2 types of contributing factors:

  1. Traumatic injuries usually happen suddenly and with great force. Examples include falling hard on the knee joint, or being stuck on or near the knee.
  2. Chronic injuries develop over a longer period of time and are often the result of repeated stress to the knee. This stress can cause the knee joints to move out of normal alignment; in some cases, your kneecaps may either be closer to each other or farther apart than they should be.

Other possible reasons for chronic injuries may include: obesity, ligament weakness, not having enough protection from heel-strike shock, foot/ankle problems, improper exercise or lifting techniques, etc. Organic conditions would include infections and tumors. Your doctor will give you a thorough examination which may include a range of motion (ROM) and orthopedic testing – to search for possible alignment/tracking problems and to test for signs of muscle or ligament weakness to help determine the cause of your knee pain.

What are some of the causes of knee alignment problems?

The knee is actually made up of 2 joints involving 3 bones. As a hinge joint, the healthy knee bends in 1 plane of motion much more than it rotates, although some rotation is involved during the gait (walking) cycle. In a normal posture, the kneecaps point straight ahead over the feet. This is the knee posture, which gives the most support to the hips and spine.

Problems occur when a knee becomes misaligned. A cause for this misalignment can start in the foot or ankle. If 1 or both feet have a structural problem (e.g., flat feet, high arch, weak ankles), this condition can cause the leg to rotate improperly and apply tension to the knee. As knee muscles and ligaments weaken, the joint may begin to move out of its proper position. These imbalances have a potential ripple effect, which can affect the hips, low back, and neck. That’s why you’ll often encounter someone whose back started hurting after he or she began having knee problems.

How can my healthcare professional help me to get better?

Again, depending on the diagnosis of your condition, your healthcare professional has treatment programs to help restore your knees to normal function. Along with any determination of the need for rest or other therapies (ice, ultrasound, etc.), a 3-step program is often indicated:

  • Manipulation (adjustment) of the joint for proper alignment
  • Exercise to build muscle strength and joint stability
  • Use of functional orthotics to help reduce excessive internal and external rotation, and to help absorb heel-strike shock

Developing knee muscles helps to stabilize the joint and to prevent further serious injury. Your doctor may prescribe therapeutic exercises to help you rebuild strength in the knee area. Often these exercises can be done either in your healthcare professional’s office or in your own home.

Balanced support, stability, and proper movement are the keys to a healthy knee structure. Ask your healthcare professional if functional orthotics or therapeutic exercises would help you.

Take the Test

  1. Do you stand or walk on hard surfaces for more than 4 hours daily?
  2. Do you participate regularly in any physical sport (basketball, baseball, tennis, golf, bowling, etc)?
  3. Are you age 40 or over?
  4. Have you had a prior injury to your knee, back or neck?
  5. Do your shoes wear unevenly?
  6. Do you have joint pain while standing, walking or running?
  7. Is one of your legs shorter than the other?
  8. Do you have knock-knees or bow legs?
  9. Do you have obvious foot problems (bunions, corns, flat feet, etc)?
  10. Do your feet “toe-out” when you’re walking?

If you checked yes on any of the above, you may want to visit a chiropractor!

Give us a call to schedule an appointment @ 667-240-2923

You are amazing! Is joint pain keeping you from your best active self?

Do you remember when you could do anything you wanted to do and nothing hurt? When did knees and ankles and hips and shoulders and so on start to hurt, and why can’t you recover as you used to? I don’t like it when people say they are just getting old. People say that to me at all ages. What I say is this: it isn’t necessary to become immobile as we get older, to hurt all the time or to feel that you shouldn’t take that hike, run that 5K or even that marathon, sit on the floor with your children or grandchildren, spend the day at a museum, walk around the lake, travel to that wonderful place you have dreamed of. It is so disappointing to imagine that those things are not possible, and there are things that can be done to allow you to feel much better. I do understand. I am 61 years old and I can’t believe it. I feel like I am 37, or even 27. And my body sometimes does betray me, but I am a stubborn woman, and I still want to be active. And as a chiropractor and natural health care provider, I want to help you stay active too (it might be good to have a determined stubborn doctor in your corner rooting for you). If you are less active than you want to be, with baby steps, I believe that you can become more involved in the activities you love or even take up new activities. So come join me to talk about these things, see how to have more energy and less pain and get back to living your amazing life!