Men’s Health

Men’s Health

A man’s body goes through many different changes throughout life. Following a healthy diet, exercise routine & mindfulness practice will help keep your body in balance and at ease.

Muscle Loss

Age-related muscle loss, called sarcopenia, is a natural part of aging. After age 30, you begin to lose as much as 3% to 5% per decade. Most men will lose about 30% of their muscle mass during their lifetimes.

One possible contributor to sarcopenia is the natural decline of testosterone, the hormone that stimulates protein synthesis and muscle growth. Think of testosterone as the fuel for your muscle-building fire. Therefore, the best means to build muscle mass, no matter your age, is progressive resistance training. With PRT, you gradually amp up your workout volume—weight, reps, and sets—as your strength and endurance improve. This constant challenging workout builds muscle and keeps you away from plateaus where you stop making gains.

Natural Ways to Boost Testosterone

  • Exercise & lift weights
  • Eating enough protein, fat and carbs
  • Minimize stress and cortisol levels
  • Get enough Vitamin D
  • Zinc, Vitamin B, Ashwagandha
  • Restful, high-quality sleep
  • Limit exposure to estrogen-like chemicals (BPA, parabens, plastic)

Relaxation Exercises: No one can avoid all stress, but you can counteract its detrimental effects by learning how to produce the relaxation response, a state of deep rest that is the polar opposite of the stress response. The relaxation response puts the brakes on stress and brings your body and mind back into a state of equilibrium.

  • Progressive muscle relaxation: a two-step process in which you systematically tense and relax different muscle groups in the body. With regular practice, it gives you an intimate familiarity with what tension—as well as complete relaxation—feels like in different parts of the body.
    • Loosen clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
    • Take a few minutes to breathe in and out in slow, deep breaths.
    • When you’re ready, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
    • Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
    • Relax your foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and how your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
    • Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
    • Shift your attention to your left foot. Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release.
    • Move slowly up through your body, contracting and relaxing the different muscle groups.

Most Common Chronic Illness in Men: Heart Disease

Inflammation in the body creates a dangerous environment for your health. It can cause heart, liver, hormonal and prostate problems among other things.

How to lower your risk:

  1. Eat a diet high in fiber (see diagram below for food tips)
    1. Regular exercise
    1. Avoiding smoking & drinking alcohol
    1. Reduce stress (meditate, restorative exercise like yoga)
    1. Have healthy relationships

Healthy Eating for Prostate Health

  • Eat a 2:1 ratio of vegetables to fruits each day. Go for those with deep, bright color.
  • Choose whole-grain options.
  • Limit your consumption of red meat, including beef, pork, lamb, and goat, and processed meats, such as bologna and hot dogs. Fish, skinless poultry, beans, and eggs are healthier sources of protein. Opt for grass-fed, hormone free meat, dairy & eggs – they are the best source of protein because they provide the proper ratios of all the essential amino acids.
  • Choose healthful fats, such as olive oil, nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans), and avocados. Limit saturated fats from dairy and other animal products. Fats from dairy and animal products are healthy when the source is clean. Avoid partially hydrogenated fats (trans fats), which are in many fast foods and packaged foods.
  • Avoid sugar-sweetened drinks, such as sodas and many fruit juices. Eat sweets as an occasional treat if at all.
  • Cut down on salt. Choose foods low in sodium by reading and comparing food labels. Limit the use of canned, processed, and frozen foods. Use unprocessed salts like sea salt.
  • Watch portion sizes. Eat slowly, and stop eating when you are full.
Healthy Household Cleaning

Healthy Household Cleaning

The best-known cleaning products are also the ones laced heavily with harsh chemicals. Mr. Clean, Windex, Clorox — all effective, none organic or safe for the body. The problem with switching over to more ecofriendly cleaning products — ones that won’t coat your home with brain-cell-killing fumes — is that lots of brands claim to be “natural” or “organic.” But unlike the USDA-certified-organic stickers you can look for in a grocery store’s produce section, you won’t find any such federal regulation in the housekeeping aisle. (These kinds of companies aren’t even required to list their ingredients, meaning they can sneak in chemicals without mentioning them anywhere on the bottle.)

Some of the most dangerous toxins out there reside in our cleaning products, and we’re putting our health at risk by exposing ourselves to them on a daily basis. Researchers at the University of Washington tested a variety of popular household cleaning products, including air fresheners, all-purpose cleaners, soaps, laundry detergents, dish soap, dryer sheets and fabric softeners, as well as personal care products like shampoos, deodorants and lotions.

Volatile organic compounds are gases emitted from solids or liquids. They’re found in many household products, from paints and varnishes to cleaning products and disinfectants. The EPA states that some of the risks associated with VOCs are:

  • Eye, nose and throat irritation
  • Headaches, loss of coordination and nausea
  • Damage to liver, kidney and central nervous system
  • Some VOCs can cause cancer in animals, and some are suspected or known to cause cancer in humans

In summary, this is what they found:

  • A whopping 133 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the products – even in those labelled ‘green’, ‘natural’ or ‘organic’.
  • On average, 17 VOCs were found in each product, with anywhere from 1-8 of those 17 chemicals being toxic or hazardous.
  • Nearly half of the products contained at least one of 24 carcinogenic air pollutants that have no safe exposure level, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Check out EWG.org or the “ThinkDirty” app to check the toxicity levels of your household cleaning items and beauty products!

“Clean” Cleaning Products

  • Green Works
  • Dr. Bronners Castile Soap
  • Ecos
  • Seventh Generation
  • Method
  • JR Watkins
  • Mrs. Meyers
  • Common Good

Making Your Own Cleaning Products

(use glass bottles if possible, essential oils optional)

All-Purpose Cleaner

  • 2c water
  • 2tb castile soap

OR

  • 1c water
  • 1c white distilled vinegar
  • ½ lemon juiced

Deep-Cleaning Bathroom Cleaner

  • 1 2/3c baking soda
  • 1/2c liquid castile soap
  • 1/2c water
  • 2tbs white vinegar
  • 1. Mix baking soda and liquid soap in a bowl. Dilute with water and add the vinegar. Stir the mixture with a fork until any lumps have been dissolved. Pour the liquid into the bottle. Shake well before using.

Carpet Stains

  • 2bs salt dissolved in 1/2c white vinegar
  • Let the solution dry, then vacuum. For larger or darker stains, add 2 tablespoons borax to the mixture and use in the same way.

Glass & Mirror Cleaner

  • 1/2c rubbing/isopropyl alcohol
  • 1/3c white distilled vinegar
  • Distilled water
  • Add alcohol & vinegar to the bottle, then fill with water.

Laundry Stain & Spot Remover

  • 1 1/2c water
  • 1/4c liquid castile soap
  • 1/4c liquid vegetable glycerin
  • Treat spot immediately and let soak before tossing into wash

Gnat Trap

Mix 3 parts apple cider vinegar and 1 part water in a shallow bowl. Add 3-4 drops of dish soap. The smell of the vinegar will attract them and the dish soap breaks the surface tension of the vinegar/water. Now when they land they are stuck.

http://nymag.com/strategist/article/best-natural-organic-cleaning-products.html
Spring & Summer Health Talks

Spring & Summer Health Talks

Join us for our FREE Health Talks which are on Tuesdays from 6:30-7:30pm at the office! Friends & family are welcomed!

For people who have never had a Nutrition Response Testing analysis, those who attend a health talk will receive a discounted exam and consultation for only $49 when that appointment is completed within two weeks. (Limited time offer)

You can always tune in to our Facebook page to watch the talk live by clicking here: https://www.facebook.com/DrLisaGordon

SEATING IS LIMITED – please give us a call at 410-717-6610 to reserve your spot!

April 23rd: Women’s Health & Hormones

May 14th: Digestive Dysfunction

May 28th: Migraines, Headaches & Chronic Pain

June 11th: Prostate & Men’s Health

June 25th: How the Liver Causes Skin Reactions

July 9th: Anxiety & Depression

July 23rd: Chronic Inflammation & Immune Challenges

August 13th: Sleep & Insomnia

August 27th: Women’s Health & Hormones

Is there a topic you would like us to discuss at one of our Health Talks? We love your feedback! Let us know your suggestions by emailing gabrielle@drlisagordon.com.

Muscle Strengthening & Stretching

Muscle Strengthening & Stretching

Whether you’re a chronic sitter, a daily exerciser, or a weekend warrior, you probably know stretching is a critical habit. By sending blood flow to your muscles and helping your joints move through their full range of motion, stretching improves your posture and athletic performance while lowering your risk of pain and injury in everyday life.

If there’s one universal truth about stretching, it’s that we all should do it. Yet few of us actually do. By taking a few minutes in the morning and in the middle of your day to focus on stretching, it can make a world of difference not only with your flexibility but it can also help with mental clarity and anxiety.

In the AM, take 5-10 minutes to do these easy yet effective stretches IN BED!

Full-Body Stretch

On an inhale, reach your arms overhead, clasp your fingers together, flip your palms out toward the wall behind your head, and push your palms away from you. At the same time, reach your toes away from your arms, keeping your knees straight. Hold this fully stretched position for 5 counts, then exhale and release the stretch. Repeat 3 times total. This releases tightness throughout the entire body, which tends to accumulate during sleep. (1)

1
2
3

Figure-Four Stretch

Cross your right foot over your left knee, making the shape of the number 4. Slowly bend your left knee up toward the ceiling, either keeping the left foot on your mattress or hugging it in toward your chest. Be sure to keep your right knee bent out to the right as you try to maintain this shape. Hold for 5 deep breaths, then switch sides. This stretch helps lubricate the hip joints, thighs, and glutes. (2)

Bed-to-Floor Stretch

Swing your feet over the side of the bed so that they touch the floor. Keeping your knees bent, hang your head and arms down to the floor, rounding your back over your knees. Let your head and arms dangle to the floor; hold for 5 breaths. This helps stretch the back and helps you wake up thanks to a fresh supply of oxygen to the brain. (3)

Supine Twist

From Knees-to-Chest Stretch, release your grip of your shins and let your arms fall out to a “T” shape on either side of your torso. Use your core to guide your legs over to rest on one side, keeping your knees bent and shoulders planted down into your mattress. If it’s easy on your neck, gaze toward the opposite side. Hold for 10 deep breaths, then repeat on the other side. Twists like this one awaken the body by increasing circulation and stretching the spinal muscles. (4)

4

Knees-to-Chest

From a supine position, bend your knees until the soles of your feet are on the bed. Use your hands to draw one knee in toward your chest at a time, wrapping your arms around both shins. Relax your head on your pillow and hold this “self-hug” for 10 deep breaths, says Brooke Blocker, a yoga teacher in New York City. This stretch helps you gently wake up the low back and stimulate the mind and body, helping you feel ready to start your day. (5)

5

Seated Forward Bend

Begin by lifting your torso upright from a reclined position. Keeping your legs straight, inhale and lengthen through your spine; as you exhale, start to walk your fingertips toward your feet. Keep lengthening your spine with your inhalation and sink a bit deeper into this seated forward fold with your exhalation. When you get to your farthest point, let your neck hang heavy toward your legs, releasing any tension. After 10 rounds of breath, slowly lift your torso back up. This forward bend is especially beneficial after resting all night and before standing or sitting all day, as it stretches the hamstrings, pelvis, and spine. (6)

6

In the middle of your day, try these seated stretches!

Seated Spinal Twist

This is a great way to release the tension in your back that starts building up almost as soon as you sit down.

Sit on your chair sideways so that your shoulders and back are perpendicular to the back of the chair. Sit up straight, place your feet on the ground and place your hands on the back of the chair. Using your arms, twist, pulling yourself toward the chair. Switch the side of the chair you’re sitting on and repeat. This pose stretches out the spine, chest, and neck. Take approximately 8 to 10 breaths on each side. (1)

1

Cat/Cow Stretch

Do you know one of the primary differences between feeling old and feeling young? Spinal flexibility. If you’re starting to move around the office like a rheumatic orangutan, this move can definitely help.

Sit up straight, place your feet flat on the floor, and rest the palms of your hands on top of your knees. Inhale, arch your back and look up, pulling your shoulders back as you do so. This will open up the whole front of the torso and neck. When you exhale, round your spine, pull the shoulders toward each other at the front of the body and drop your head toward your chest. This will stretch and open the back, shoulders, and neck. Do approximately 8 to 10 complete rounds. (2)

2

Eagle Arms

This move will help take the burden of being a desk potato off of your shoulders and upper back.

While sitting, reach your arms straight out in front of you, keeping them parallel with your shoulders and shoulder-distance apart. Bend the left arm upward and sweep the right arm under it. Wrap your right arm around the left until you are able to grab the outside edge of the left arm or until you are able to clasp your palms together. Lift the elbows away toward the ceiling and pull your hands away from your face. Turn your head side-to-side. Repeat on the other side. This will stretch the muscles under the shoulder blades, the upper back, shoulders, and neck. Hold each side for approximately 8 to 10 breaths. (3)

3

Chest Opener

Another issue with desk jobs is that they tend to cause you to develop pretty tight chest and shoulder muscles. Thankfully, none of our avian friends are invoked for this position—you can stay right in your chair and do it.

Simply interlace your fingers behind you and place your arms on the top of your chair’s backrest. Drop your chin to your chest. Your chest, shoulders, and neck will appreciate it. Hold this pose for 8 to 10 breaths. (4)

4

Wrist & Fingers Stretch

Stand, place both hands on your desk, palms faced down, fingertips facing your body. To intensify the stretch, lean forward. Hold the stretch until you feel the tension release. (5)

5

Neck Rolls

To give them relief, sit up straight in your chair with your feet flat on the floor. Bring your chin toward your chest and roll the right ear to the right shoulder. To intensify the stretch, place your left hand on top of your right shoulder and place your right hand just above your left ear. Gently apply pressure with the hand on your head hand and breathe through the stretch. Take approximately 8 to 10 breaths, then switch to the other side. (6)

6

https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise-stretching#beginner’s-stretches

https://www.prevention.com/fitness/g20490060/do-these-stretches-before-getting-out-of-bed/

What is Designed Clinical Nutrition?

What is Designed Clinical Nutrition?

What is Designed Clinical Nutrition?

  • Designed: Especially prepared for you, based on a specific plan.
  • Clinical: Pertaining to the results achieved in clinical use on a multitude of patients over many years.
  • Nutrition: Real food, as designed by nature, to enable the body to repair itself and become healthier.

After you receive your analysis, you will get a specifically designed nutrition program, based off the information your body provides. Most programs include dietary suggestions (as well as whole food supplements) to aid your body in healing itself. Concentrated whole food supplements are used. These have been prepared by a unique process that preserves all of the active enzymes and vital components.

How do I know which supplements are right for me?

After we identify the underlying reason your body is creating symptoms, we can isolate and verify the precise whole food supplements (and quantities) your body needs to resolve its problems. Our goal is to have you take as few supplements as possible, with your body being fulling addressed and restored at the same time.

What are “whole foods”?

Whole foods are defined as “food that has undergone very little processing and has been grown or produced without the use of synthetic pesticides or fertilizers. A good example is carrots. Carrots are rich in vitamin A complex. A “complex” is something made up of different parts which work together. Synthetic vitamins do not contain the whole complex (as found in nature).

If testing indicated a vitamin A deficiency, we would look for a whole food high in vitamin A complex (carrots would be a likely source). A supplements rich in this complex would then be included in your program. We pride ourselves on only using the highest quality whole food supplements available.

Whole food supplements are entirely derived from specific whole foods, organically grown and prepared in such a way that preserves their vital enzymes and vitamins; making them the optimum vitamin-mineral products. Now in incredibly concentrated form, your body can get complete nutrition from this small tablet! By restoring the nutrition on which your body was founded, it is possible to enable your body to heal itself just as nature intended.

I thought I ate well…

Although deficiencies may be due to illness, it is likely that other factors my be contributing to the problem also, some of which may be contained in the food you eat every day. A few factors of the “food” commercially available in all grocery stores and restaurants:

  • microwaving
  • food coloring
  • flash freezing
  • hormones and antibiotics (in meat, chicken, etc.)
  • produce grown in soil that has been robbed of its nutrients
  • harmful chemicals and metals (such as pcb’s and mercury in some fish)
  • genetic engineering
  • synthetic additives
  • preservatives

If any of these are involved in the creation or processing of your food, then what you are eating is really just “disguised” as food. Not only does this “food” have insufficient nutritional vale, it may also contain toxins which work against your body and your health. In contrast, whole foods that have not been altered or contaminated contain genuine replacement parts as part of nature’s design.

Can’t I just eat better?

There has been a drastic decline in the quality of food over the past 70 years, resulting in a nation of sick people who are dependent on pharmaceutical drugs. Your body’s function is founded on nourishment from the environment (which until recently did not include heavy metals, toxic chemicals and pesticides).

Current food conditions make it next to impossible to get all of the nutritional components your body requires to heal and/or maintain resiliency.

How long will it take for me to start feeling healthy again?

Each case is handled on an individual basis. The majority of patients who adhere to their programs have reported noticing positive changes in the first 4-6 weeks (some longer, and some sooner). Your improvement is directly proportional to the adherence to your program.

Do I have to stay on a Designed Clinical Nutrition regimen forever?

Through the course of your program additional layers will show up. For example, if you have a long term health problem, you may find that your body may (or may not) want to address this first. Your body will dictate its priority each time you are tested. When its priority problem is handled with correct nutrients, your next test may reveal another major issue (which may have been hidden and unhandled).

As this happens, we will adjust your program. Our goal is to have you on as few supplements possible. Good dietary habits will always be encouraged. If you continue poor habits, this will perpetuate ill health and inhibit your body’s natural ability to heal itself. As you feel better and your health improves, you will likely find yourself wanting to maintain a well balanced and healthy diet as your normal routine.

How do I get a Designed Clinical Nutrition Program?

As a Nutrition Response Testing patient, you will receive an individualized program based on the results of your analysis. The program will match the exact needs of your body through diet and nutritional supplementation. The elements in your personal Designed Clinical Nutrition program are nutrients that your body is not currently receiving and/or assimilating.

 

 

NEW Winter Health Talks

NEW Winter Health Talks

After surveying our community, we have decided to switch our FREE Health Talks to TUESDAY nights from 6:30-7:15pm!

Friends and family are always welcomed, give us a call to reserve your spot @ 410-717-6610.

 

Check out our upcoming schedule:

December 17th: Anxiety & Depression

January 7th: Skin Health – eczema, psoriasis, acne, rashes

January 22nd: Stress Relief & Mindfulness Techniques

February 12th: Is sugar sabotaging your health?

February 26th: Spring detox

March 12th: Anti-inflammatory cooking tips

March 26th: Stretching & muscle strengthening

April 9th: Healthy household cleaning

April 23rd: Women’s health

May 14th: Digestive dysfunction